Risk Supplement to the Vulnerability Sourcebook

The Risk Supplement to the Vulnerability Sourcebook (PDF) introduces the IPCC AR5 risk concept and provides guidelines on how to conduct risk assessments using the Vulnerability Sourcebook’s approach.

The Vulnerability Sourcebook (PDF) provides step-by-step guidelines to conduct robust vulnerability assessments according to the IPCC concept of vulnerability. Since its publication in 2014, it has been widely used for vulnerability assessments in the framework of climate change adaptation planning from the local to the national level. The Fifth IPCC Assessment Report (AR5) moved from focusing on vulnerability to focusing on risk of climate-related impacts that may harm a system. To account for this change, in 2017 this Risk Supplement has been developed.

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The Vulnerability Sourcebook

Climate change adaptation creates a significant reduction of vulnerability towards current and future climate change impacts; hence a good understanding of local vulnerabilities, the implementation of appropriate adaptation measures and the continuous review of their effectiveness are of importance. The GIZ has developed several approaches and tools to enhance adaptation to climate change among which the relatively new tool: the Vulnerability Sourcebook. This tool, among other purposes, is very useful for further implementation of the National Adaptation Planning (NAP) process.

The Vulnerability Sourcebook offers practitioners a step-by-step approach to conduct vulnerability assessments and monitor and evaluate changes of vulnerability over time. It can be applied from the local to the national level and to a broad range of sectors.

The Vulnerability Sourcebook contains 8 modules, which provide detailed guidance on how to conduct a vulnerability assessment. They cover the preparation phase, the development of impact chains, the selection of indicators, how to gather the necessary data, how to process this data for vulnerability assessments, and how to present the findings. Furthermore, the Vulnerability Sourcebook highlights how practitioners can use vulnerability assessments for monitoring and evaluation (M&E).

In practice: Tracking adaptation success using the Vulnerability Sourcebook in Bolivia

Bolivia is one of the four countries where the Vulnerability Sourcebook has been piloted. Within the context of the German-Bolivian agricultural development programme PROAGRO, a vulnerability assessment was carried out in the Andean community of Chullcu Mayu. Using the approach of the Vulnerability Sourcebook, it was analysed to what extent vulnerability of smallholder farmers to climate impacts had been reduced by improving the community’s irrigation systems.

Read more about the application of the Vulnerability Sourcebook in Bolivia.

New Factsheets: Climate Impacts on Agricultural Crops

In order to support focused adaptation efforts in agriculture, GIZ commissioned a detailed study about how different crops are affected by climate change. Impacts do not only depend on the type of crop and its location, but also vary during a plant’s stages of growth. In addition, different aspects of climate change can have different adverse, but also beneficial effects. Detailed knowledge can help make the right decisions.

Fact sheets are now available for download for each of the studied crops – rice, maize, coffee, and sorghum and millet. They will give you an overview about how complex the effects of climate change can be. The full study, which is forthcoming, will elaborate on the effects and their consequences in more detail.

Final version of CIFOR study on climate impact chains in coastal areas

CIFOR’s study on climate change impact chains in coastal areas, funded by the Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), was presented already in two webinars this year. The final report has been finished just in time for the holidays and is now available for download on AdaptationCommunity.net. In the study, you can read how five different stressors may create hazards and affect the vulnerability of coastal ecosystems: ocean acidification, ocean warming, precipitation, sea-level rise, and tropical storms.

Of course the study points out a vast body of academic literature that can be used to inform planners in even more detail. Abstracts and methods are provided in an extensive annex. For practical use, it is also accompanied by two short policy briefs: one about the potential of ecosystem-based adaptation strategies in Indonesia and the Philippines, and another one giving a quick overview of the impact chains for those who are short on time.

This fair amount of reading should keep you busy for the next two weeks, when this website will be a bit quieter due to the Christmas holidays. For those of you who celebrate it, AdaptationCommunity.net wishes you a merry Christmas, and a happy New Year to you all!