New Publications: “Cai Lon – Cai Be sluice gate climate risk assessment”

90% of Vietnam´s rice exports and 70% of aquaculture is produced in the Mekong Delta, highlighting the importance as well as dependency of the region to rain. With the changing climate, crop failure due to saltwater intrusion is becoming more frequent. The well-functioning of sluice gates is therefore vital to prevent disasters and guarantee the provision of food in Vietnam.

An infrastructure-oriented climate risk assessment was piloted for the planned Cai Lon – Cai Be sluice gate system project in the Mekong Delta– an infrastructure investment by the Government of Vietnam with an estimated budget of USD 145 million, starting from 2018 until 2021 with a significant function to prevent salt water intrusion, especially with regards to higher probabilities of severe droughts.

An assessment team of Vietnamese hydro-meteorologist, climatologist, water infrastructure engineers and planners, and civil experts was formed to conduct a climate risk assessment according to the PIEVC Protocol (Public Infrastructure and Engineering Vulnerability Committee).

The study results proved that the PIEVC Protocol has a high potential to be applied for climate risk assessments of infrastructures (both planned projects and existing infrastructure) in Viet Nam. With enhanced capacities, the climate risk assessment can serve as a nationwide decision support tool for the infrastructure investors and planners in Viet Nam.

Download the report here.

New Publication: ” A recipe for the service of climate risk assessment”

In the context of climate risk assessment in Vietnam, a new report aiming to facilitate the replica of the approach has been developed. 

Resources, capital and capacities are required for the assessment of climate risk, however the availability, quantity and expenses are beforehand unknown for decision-makers. How many people would need to be hired? What level of expertise is required? How long will it take? How much is it going to cost? The lack of answers to these questions limit or delay the decision by project owners or investment planners whether or not to conduct a climate risk assessment for their infrastructure investments.

To facilitate and streamline the replica of the Cai Lon-Cai Be sluice gate climate risk assessment in Vietnam, this document provides a detail description of the kind of services needed. Based on the structure of a typical recipe, the provided services are divided in three components; procedure, quantity and costs. To illustrate the application of the proposed recipe as well as highlight the relevant inputs under different circumstances, three scenarios with variation on the users (public or privat) and the planing stages ( feasibility study and after construction) were showcased.

All in all, this document aims to streamline the decision-making process and facilitate the cost-benefits analysis by making available a tool which helps weight alternatives.

Download the full report here.

New Publications: ” Climate risk assessment on infrastructure: A report about the bridge over the Tempisque river in Guardia, Costa Rica”

In 2017 a tropical storm in Costa Rica caused damages worth 577 Million dollars which are the equivalent of 1% of their GDP. Extreme floods, storms and hurricanes are increasing due to climate change. These hydro-meteorological events pose a big threat to the well-functioning of infrastructures as well as to the provision of those services. To name one example, the road surface as well as the structure of the bridge over the Tempisque river in Guardia was damaged during extreme floods.  Over 20 000 vehicles cross it every day, highlighting the socio-economic impact on the population.

To analyse the exposure and hazard of this infrastructure, a climate risk assessment was piloted based on the PIEVC Protocol. The multidisciplinary approach of this methodology required collaborative work between diverse organisations; from the Ministry of Environment and Energy (MINAE)  or the National Meteorological Institute (IMN) to the National Road Council (CONAVI), building thus new networks. Throughout the assessment, the current vulnerability of the bridge´s components were analysed as well as the impact of current and future hydro-meteorological events were estimated.

In a nutshell, the report provides decision-makers with necessary information to adopt adaptation measurements towards the operation of a climate-resilient bridge. Of equal importance is the development of capacities among the local population as well as the mainstream of the approach.

Lastly, the assessment has incentivised to develop a climate risk assessment tool tailor-made the to Costa Rican context. The report is only available in Spanish.

Download the full report here.

SB50 Side Event on Climate-Risk-Informed Infrastructure Planning

The increase in occurrence of extreme events is having considerable impacts on infrastruc- ture, raising serious concerns in decision- makers responsible for infrastructure planning. Ensuring the future climate-resilience of infra- structure means making evidence-based plan- ning and management decisions today. For this, climate services play an essential role. However, so far climate services catering to the specific needs of the infrastructure sector are underdeveloped. This event deals with the question of how this can be changed.

The Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) was established in 2009 to bridge the gap between climate service providers and usersin order to make climate services more useful for decision-making. It offers guidance on how to establish the technical, service and institutional capacities for climate service use and provision along the climate service value chain. The question is how the GFCS can be operationalised in service of better climate ser- vices for the infrastructure sector.

The event highlights two experiences from the African context of translating the guidance of the GFCS into practice. One case explores the challenges and lessons learned from estab- lishing a National Framework for Climate Ser- vices (NFCS) as foundation for effective cli- mate service governance in Tanzania.

The other deals with experiences from using climate services for climate proofing in the    water resource sector in the Nile Basin and how pilot experiences in this area can be upscaled in the context of the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI).

The event is organised by the World Meteoro- logical Organisation (WMO), which hosts the GFCS Secretariat, and the global project En- hancing Climate Services for Infrastructure In- vestments (CSI) that is implemented by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) in the context of the International Cli- mate Initiative (IKI).

Program

WELCOME NOTE

Maxx Dilley, WMO

Bernd-Markus Liss, GIZ

KEY NOTE

Transforming Infrastructure for a Climate-Resilient

Future

GFCS – What is GFCS (philosophy, priority areas, regional implementation, NFCS, trainings,) Maxx Dilley, WMO

CASE STUDIES

National experiences in the provision of climate services

(NFCS, capacity development, climate proofing, infrastructure); Ladislaus Chang’a, Tanzania Meteorological Agency

Climate Services for the Climate Proofing of Water Resource Infrastructure in the Nile Basin: Andy Tola, Nile Basin Initiative

PANEL DISCUSSION

Moderator: Katharina Lotzen

 WRAP UP

LOGISTICS

Date:            19th of June 2019

Time:            13:30 – 15:00

Location:    Room Nile (Ground Floor), Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 40 (Building 2, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH)         15 min on foot from WCCB

Organiser: World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Contact:      Katharina Lotzen (Advisor, GIZ); katharina.lotzen@giz.de

No registration or SBSTA accreditation required

Find more details on the event here. You can join online using this link.

UNFCCC SB48 Side Event – Climate Risk Management for Infrastructure Investment

What are challenges and potentials of mainstreaming climate risk management into infrastructure investment planning? How can the mainstreaming of climate risk management into infrastructure planning serve NAP implementation? How can the use and provision of Climate Information and Services serve national adaptation planning and what are the associated challenges?

On Wednesday 2nd of May 2018 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. these questions will be adressed in an event titled “Climate Risk Management for Infrastructure – Building Adaptive Capacity and Furthering NAP Implementation” organised by the World Federation of Engineering Organisations (WFEO), Engineers Canada and the Deutsche Gesellschaft of Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH in collaboration with the Ministry of the Environment (MMA) Brazil and the Ministry of the Environment and Energy (MINAE) Costa Rica, as well as the German Meteorological Service (DWD).

The objective of the event is to share and discuss the experiences of Brazil and Costa Rica in strengthening infrastructure resilience in the context of their national adaptation planning and to examine the challenges and opportunities of mainstreaming climate risk management into infrastructure planning. One key challenge discussed is that of enhancing the provision of, access to and use of the necessary Climate Information and Services in this context.

The port of Itajaí (Brazil) and the Guardia Bridge (Costa Rica) are presented as case studies of the application of the Protocol for the climate vulnerability assessment of infrastructure, developed by Engineers Canada. They serve as practical example for climate risk assessments as essential element of climate risk management.

Details

  •  Date: 2 May 2018
  • Time: 11:30 – 14:00 (including light lunch)
  • Place: GIZ HQs, Room “Saal Donau” (Ground Floor), Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 36, Bonn (Mäanderbau Building)

Contact: No registration or SBSTA accreditation required. To facilitate logistics, please kindly contact Katharina Lotzen (katharina.lotzen@giz.de) or Darrel Danyluk (mrdjd48@gmail.com) if you are interested in attending.

Speakers:

Andrea Meza, Costa Rica – Ministry of the Environment and Energy (MINAE), Director of the Department of Climate Change

José Miguez (TBC), Brazil – Ministry of the Environment (MMA), Director of the Department for Climate Change Policy

David Lapp (FEC, P.Eng. IRP), Engineers Canada, Practice Lead, Globalization and Sustainable Development

Darrel Danyluk (P.Eng. FCAE, FEIC, FCSCE, FEC), Chair of the Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) and the WFEO Committee on Engineering and the Environment

Stefan Rösner, Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), Head of the Division for „Regional Climate Monitoring“

Benjamin Hodick, GIZ, Head of Project „Climate Services for Infrastructure Investments (CSI)“