Now available online: „Connecting the Dots: Elements for a Joined-Up Implementation of the 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement”

This study by WRI and GIZ on national-level implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change suggests that both proceed on different tracks, despite the growing recognition of the ample opportunities they present for synergies.

In most countries, climate actions under the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and national targets underpinning the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been defined and advanced separately. This siloed approach makes little sense given the short window of opportunity for tackling the interlinked challenges of climate change, ecosystem degradation, inequality rise, and political instability

Drawing on experience in 11 countries and the European Union, this paper provides core elements and concrete examples for jointly advancing these agendas, with a focus on five challenges: coordinating institutions, ensuring alignment and synergy of SDG and NDC targets, mainstreaming both sets of goals into policy planning, optimizing financial resources, and building mutually reinforcing monitoring and reporting frameworks. The research also explores how international development can better support national efforts at linking both agendas.

This study shows that joining up implementation requires governments to make significant shifts in institutional, policy, financial, and monitoring frameworks in order to enhance policy coherence, and cost efficiency.

The main points of the study’s table of contents are:

  1. Introduction
  2. Coordinating Institutions to Bridge Both Implementation Processes
  3. Fostering Alignment and Synergies between National SDG and Climate Targets
  4. Jointly Mainstreaming the SDGs and the NDCs in National Planning
  5. Optimizing Budgetary and Financial Frameworks
  6. Developing Mutually Reinforcing Monitoring, Evaluation, and Reporting Systems
  7. Joining up the Two Agendas in International Development
  8. Conclusions and Key Recommendations

To download the study please click here

  • Dec 10, 2019 Climate Risk Analysis for Identifying and Weighing Adaptation Strategies in Ghana’s Agricultural Sector With climate change impacts increasingly affecting people’s livelihoods and dampening economic growth perspectives, effective adaptation is essential to ensure that already achieved development gains are not endangered. However, often only limited information is available on climate change impacts, especially in the long-term, […]
    Read more
  • Oct 01, 2019 Climate Change Adaptation has become a central concern for sustainable development and economic policy, especially in developing countries. At the same time, financing for adaptation constitutes only a small share of the overall global climate finance and by far falls short of projected finance needs. A new publication series by adelphi about effective mobilization and […]
    Read more
  • Sep 09, 2019 A Wikipedia article on Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) is now available online. The article was co-authored by members of FEBA’s Wikipedia Working Group, with involvement of the BMU-IKI-funded GIZ Global Project Mainstreaming EbA. With this article, the Wikipedia Working Group aims to promote EbA understanding among popular and new audiences as well as to present a […]
    Read more