Climate Risk Assessment
and Management

A comprehensive framework to advert,
minimise and address loss and damage

Climate Risk Sourcebook

The Climate Risk Sourcebook (CR‐SB) delivers a conceptual framework for a comprehensive Climate Risk Assessment (CRA) together with modular instructions, divided in eight modules, on how it can be conducted (see figure below). It can be used:

  • as a ‘beginners guide’ on CRA,
  • for a rapid risk assessment at a sub‐national to local scale, to obtain an overview of the most relevant climate risks, or to prepare a more in‐depth risk assessment and/or
  • for training purposes.

Navigate through the modules by clicking on the graphic below:

Impact Chains

Impact chains represent a core element of the methodology of the Climate Risk Sourcebook. Some concrete examples of impact chains are displayed and discussed in the Sourcebook (from page 19). This page provides additional examples of impact chains serving as an inspiration when creating impact chains in a Climate Risk Assessment.

The IPCC’s sixth assessment report identified 120 key risks across sectors and regions (https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg2/chapter/chapter-16/). Below is a selection of those key risks represented in the form of impact chains using only the information in the IPCC report. The impact chains are presented by sector.

Legend:

Biodiversity

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the biodiversity sector.

  • Risk of loss and degradation of warm-water coral reef ecosystems
  • Risk of reduced biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems due to drought
  • Risk to regional marine biodiversity, ecosystem function and associated ecosystem services
  • Risk of plant and animal species extinction
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Water

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the water sector.

  • Risk of fresh water supplies not meeting demand for agriculture or drinking water
  • Risk of loss of life and damage to property from river flooding
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Agriculture

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the agricultural sector.

  • Risk of food shortages and income loss to island and coastal communities and those that rely on coastal food production, particularly rice and coastal aquaculture
  • Risk of hunger, loss of livelihood for fisheries-dependent populations, and transboundary conflict arising from the movement of aquatic resources
  • Risk to livelihoods of livestock keepers seriously affected by increasing heat stress suffered by their animals
RISK OF HUNGER, LOSS OF LIVELIHOOD FOR FISHERIES-DEPENDENT POPULATIONS, AND TRANSBOUNDARY CONFLICT ARISING FROM THE MOVEMENT OF AQUATIC RESOURCES
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Energy

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the energy sector.

  • Risk of reduced energy supplies due to hydrological impacts
  • Risk to water and energy security due to drought-induced shortage of irrigation and hydropower
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Infrastructure

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the infrastructure sector.

  • Risk of damage to urban infrastructure from flooding and severe storms
  • Risk to life and property due to sea level rise and coastal flooding
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Health

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for the health sector.

  • Risk of loss of life and damage to property from wildfire
  • Risk of vector-born diseases due to increase in temperature, precipitaion and/or humidity
  • Risk to health and livelihood to agricultural labourers due to increased temperature and humidity
  • Risk to population from increased heat
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Livelihoods

Click “Show All” to display concrete examples of impact chains for livelihoods.

  • Risk of loss of livelihoods and forced migration (social tipping points) due to the degradation of livelihood assets by increasing drought and heat stress, particularly in already vulnerable regions
  • Risk to livelihoods in smallholder farming, fishing and aquaculture communities, including Indigenous communities due to more frequent extreme events
  • Risk to short-term and/or chronic food and feed shortage with cascading risk of civil unrest and social disruption
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Case Studies

General information

Project

Climate Risk Assessment for mountainous communities of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan

Overall goal

Elaboration of future climate scenarios and the analysis of climate risk based on the Impact Chain methodology in the target areas of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan to support UNEP’s “Vanishing Treasures” Programme aiming to generate maximum synergy between climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation.

Country

Tajikistan; Kyrgyzstan

Duration

1.12.2020 – 29.04.2022

Summary

Description

Mountain species that are already endangered are additionally threatened by Climate Change. UNEP’s ‘Vanishing Treasures’ Programme supports climate change adaptation of vulnerable species in mountain regions such as in Hindu-Kush Himalayas (Bhutan), in Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan) and in Virunga region (Rwanda and Uganda). In order to generate synergy between climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation it is necessary to understand current and future potential risks of climate change to local communities living in close proximity to these species and their habitats. By understanding key climate risks and potential human-wildlife conflicts climate-smart measure can be integrated into conservation planning.

Methodology

Future climate scenarios and climate risk assessments were elaborated in selected project regions and communities of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan to provide the Programme with the needed information to plan specific measures.

The assessment built upon the Impact Chain analytical approach of the Vulnerability Sourcebook Risk Supplement (https://www.adaptationcommunity.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GIZ-2017_Risk-Supplement-to-the-Vulnerability-Sourcebook.pdf). To apply this analytical approach and assess each of the risk components and the overall risk, quantitative data analyses (climate scenarios, climate indices and extremes, snow cover, glacier extent) were combined with qualitative information collected through participatory methods (workshops with experts, community consultations) and secondary sources. While the climate analysis refers to national and project region levels, the assessment of climate risks focuses on the specific communities, where community consultations and field visits took place, and for which a better understanding of climate impacts and vulnerability factors could be obtained.

Key outputs

For the visited communities in Tajikistan, the main climate risk identified and assessed refers to the risk of loss of livelihoods for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, and missing irrigation water for fodder and food production. For the visited communities in Kyrgyzstan, the main climate risk identified and assessed refers to the risk of loss of livelihoods for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, missing irrigation water for fodder and food production, and heat-exacerbated animal disease. The absence of water governance destroyed water irrigation channels and lack of investments in infrastructure development have been identified as major vulnerability factors and are currently the drivers of a mainly human-induced water stress in the visited communities of the two countries.

Impact chains

Impact chains were developed together with stakeholders for three key risks. See for example the impact chain “Risk of loss of livelihoods (income, subsistence) for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, missing irrigation water for fodder and food production and heat exacerbated animal disease” below.

Comprehensive Risk Assessment tables

Comprehensive risk assessment tables were developed for every key risk and for each project site (community level). Below is an example of such a table for the Risk of loss of livelihoods (income, subsistence) for livestock owners in Ghudara village, Tajikistan.

Documents

Images

Photo 1: High mountain landscape (© Marc Zebisch)
Photo 2: Broken irrigation channel in Suusamyr, Kyrgyzstan (© Marc Zebisch)

 

Photo 3: Community consultation in Ghudara, Tajikistan (© Eirini Skrimizea).
Photo 4: Overgrazing near Suusamyr, Kyrgyzstan (© Marc Zebisch)

 

General information

Project

Climate Risk Assessment for mountainous communities of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.

Overall goal

Elaboration of future climate scenarios and the analysis of climate risk based on the Impact Chain methodology in the target areas of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan to support UNEP’s “Vanishing Treasures” Programme aiming to generate maximum synergy between climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation.

Country

Tajikistan; Kyrgyzstan

Duration

1.12.2020 – 29.04.2022

Summary

Description

Mountain species that are already endangered are additionally threatened by Climate Change. UNEP’s ‘Vanishing Treasures’ Programme supports climate change adaptation of vulnerable species in mountain regions such as in Hindu-Kush Himalayas (Bhutan), in Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan) and in Virunga region (Rwanda and Uganda). In order to generate synergy between climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation it is necessary to understand current and future potential risks of climate change to local communities living in close proximity to these species and their habitats. By understanding key climate risks and potential human-wildlife conflicts climate-smart measure can be integrated into conservation planning.

Methodology

Future climate scenarios and climate risk assessments were elaborated in selected project regions and communities of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan to provide the Programme with the needed information to plan specific measures.

The assessment built upon the Impact Chain analytical approach of the Vulnerability Sourcebook Risk Supplement (https://www.adaptationcommunity.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GIZ-2017_Risk-Supplement-to-the-Vulnerability-Sourcebook.pdf). To apply this analytical approach and assess each of the risk components and the overall risk, quantitative data analyses (climate scenarios, climate indices and extremes, snow cover, glacier extent) were combined with qualitative information collected through participatory methods (workshops with experts, community consultations) and secondary sources. While the climate analysis refers to national and project region levels, the assessment of climate risks focuses on the specific communities, where community consultations and field visits took place, and for which a better understanding of climate impacts and vulnerability factors could be obtained.

Key outputs

For the visited communities in Tajikistan, the main climate risk identified and assessed refers to the risk of loss of livelihoods for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, and missing irrigation water for fodder and food production. For the visited communities in Kyrgyzstan, the main climate risk identified and assessed refers to the risk of loss of livelihoods for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, missing irrigation water for fodder and food production, and heat-exacerbated animal disease. The absence of water governance destroyed water irrigation channels and lack of investments in infrastructure development have been identified as major vulnerability factors and are currently the drivers of a mainly human-induced water stress in the visited communities of the two countries.

Impact chains

Impact chains were developed together with stakeholders for three key risks. See for example the impact chain “Risk of loss of livelihoods (income, subsistence) for livestock owners due to drought impact on pasture, missing irrigation water for fodder and food production and heat exacerbated animal disease” below.

Comprehensive Risk Assessment tables

Comprehensive risk assessment tables were developed for every key risk and for each project site (community level). Below is an example of such a table for the Risk of loss of livelihoods (income, subsistence) for livestock owners in Ghudara village, Tajikistan.

Documents

Images

Photo 1: High mountain landscape (© Marc Zebisch)
Photo 2: Broken irrigation channel in Suusamyr, Kyrgyzstan (© Marc Zebisch)

 

Photo 3: Community consultation in Ghudara, Tajikistan (© Eirini Skrimizea).
Photo 4: Overgrazing near Suusamyr, Kyrgyzstan (© Marc Zebisch)

 

General information

Project

Climate Risk Assessment in the Sebou Catchment, Morocco – a first pilot study of the new Climate Risk Sourcebook.

Overall goal

Test and application of the approaches of the new Climate Risk Sourcebook in the framework of Moroccan-German project “Rural Resilience – Water Resources Management for Poverty Reduction and Resilience Building” (RR) (Project-Nr., 2018.2115.6). The focus was on building impact chains for key risks and supporting the selection of adaptation options.

Country

Morocco

Duration

24.01.2023 – 24.07.2023

 

Summary

Description

This study was carried out within the scope of the GIZ project Résilience Rural (RR), which has the overall objective to strengthen the resilience of smallholder farmers in Morocco. The study looks particularly into the climate risks related to water scarcity and prepared the ground for feasible options to adapt to related pressures of the current and possible also future challenges. The geographical extent of this study is set by the Sebou River catchment in the northern part of Morocco. It strongly builds on the findings of the three intervention areas of the RR project in this region, namely Aït Hsaine Ouhaned, Aït Saïd Ouhaddou and Ouled Slimane. The study’s objective is both to support the RR project in their climate risk analysis as well as in the identification of feasible adaptation options and to present a pilot study for the online version of the new Climate Risk Sourcebook (CR-SB).

Methodology

Results were based on findings from the RR project including the collection of available information on climatic and non-climatic risk drivers within the region. Initial impact chains, that have been developed within local workshops were refined and reviewed by GIZ with the help of experts from Eurac Research. Further input on climate risks in the Sebou catchment have been collected during a field stay, a 5-day consultation with local GIZ experts and a full day workshop in Rabat with participants from different departments and NGOs.

The assessment was following the new Sourcebook with its new modules. The focus was on scoping, risk identification and risk analysis with impact chains for the current and near-term period. Furthermore, the module “Towards adaptation” was tested.

Key outputs

Key risks to three subsystems where assessed:

  • Risk to water security
  • Risk to agriculture
  • Risk to forest ecosystems

The main climate-induced water-related risk concerning smallholder farmers is a reduced quantity of water available for agricultural activities. The risk of reduced water availability in the Sebou catchment is based on the two major aspects of water supply and water demand. The water supply is mainly influenced by rising evapotranspiration losses with the consequence of reduced surface water and slowing groundwater replenishing processes. The water demand in agriculture in the catchment is strongly linked to the extension of irrigated agricultural areas. The reduced water supply combined with the increase in water demand leads to growing water stress in the region evident by drying springs and vanishing surface water in most time of the year. A severe consequence of this situation is an intensification of groundwater withdrawal for agricultural activities resulting in lowered groundwater tables, reported to be sinking by up to several meters a year.

With less water available for irrigation in agriculture, crops get exposed to more stress, which leads to less yield and a reduced quality of it. Another factor that exerts stress on yield are extreme precipitation events like hailstorm that damage the crop or can even immediately cause yield losses. On the one hand reduced yield causes for small holder farmers a key impact of a loss of income as they can sell less crops on the market. In the absence of resilience mechanisms, the population is beginning to abandon the traditional way of life and many young people are leaving the area.

Besides droughts, non-climatic drivers such as the extension of agriculture land through deforestation or grazing in forests are putting pressure on forest ecosystems. A degrading forest facilitates soil erosion, which is also likely to occur more often due to the increase of extreme rain events. This leads to the loss of biodiversity in the forest and associated with this also the loss of non-timber forest products.

Impact chains

Impact chains were developed and refined based on input form the project, consultation with GIZ experts, a field stay and workshop. Impact chains were developed for each subsystem (water, agriculture, forest and grassland ecosystems) separately. Finally, one overall impact chain with a focus on the interlinkages between the systems was developed (see Figure 1)

Identification of adaptation options

Applying the new module “Towards adaptation” and taking the identified key risks and the risk mechanisms (impact chains) into account, a series of adaptation options was identified:

For the system water & agriculture:

Vulnerability factor Measure Description Impact addressed 
Lack of coordination, monitoring and controlling of water usage/management 

Establishment of a ‘water police’ 

  

Intended to monitor withdrawals from water sources to prevent excessive, illegal pumping. This reduces the illegal emptying of groundwater reservoirs 

  

  

Increase of groundwater usage due to drilling intensification 

Sectoral conflicting objectives, 

lack of coordination, monitoring and controlling of water usage/management 

Establishment of associations of Agricultural Water Users 

  

Better coordination of farmers’ water needs, strengthen voice and resilience of individual farmers  Reduced access to water 

Lack of coordination, monitoring and controlling of water usage/management, 

lacking sewage treatment plant 

Re-use of wastewater 

Reduces dependence on rain/groundwater – can ensure irrigation during dry periods 

  

  

Less water for irrigation 
Sectoral conflicting objectives Capacity building  Intended to increase the ability to coordinate different objectives of water usage Partially/reduced access to water & rising costs in groundwater access 
Increase in private wells Awareness raising: groundwater as common resource Respecting the general good. Reduction of individual well development Increase of groundwater usage due to drilling intensification 

For the system ecosystem & biodiversity:

Vulnerability factor 

Measure 

Description 

Impact addressed 

Non-appropriate trees (e.g. eucalyptus) 

Using appropriate tree species (capacity building contributes to this) 

Less water intensive species -> less water consumption 

Reduced forest (re)generation 

Overgrazing in forest 

Job creation/reduction of poverty 

Alternative incomes outside agriculture ->  farmers no longer have to overuse/overgraze pastures to have sufficient income -> Forest able to regenerate  

  

Reduced forest (re)generation 

Extension of agricultural areas (e.g. cannabis cultivation or burning down of forest for farmland) 

Forest protection 

Establishing protected areas with limited human presence or exploitation of natural resources 

Reduced forest (re)generation 

Lack of awareness of value of forest 

Awareness raising for the forest ecosystem services 

Capacity building highlights the importance of forest ecosystem services -> appreciation and consideration for natural processes increase 

Reduced forest (re)generation & loss of forest ecosystems 

 
Figure 1: Impact chains across systems with key risks (grey boxes with red border): risk to water security due to reduced access to water, Risk to forests due to a loss of forest ecosystems, risk to agriculture due to stress on agricultural crops, risk to local communities due to rising costs for (ground-)water access, loss of income due to lesser agricultural production, loss of income due to a reduced forest production.

Documents

Images

Photo 1: unfunctional irrigation channel in Aït Saïd Ouhaddou, Morocco (© Eurac Research)
Photo 2: Workshop with national experts in Rabat (© Eurac Research)
Photo 3: Sebou catchment (© Eurac Research)

General information

Project

Programme de Renforcement des conditions et Capacités d’adaptation durable au Changement Climatique/ Programme d’appui au gestion d`environnement (PRCCC/PAGE)
Programme to Strengthen Conditions and Capacities for Sustainable Adaptation to Climate Change/ Environmental Management Support Programm .

Overall goal

The overall objective was to identify climate related risks and to development context-specific adaptation solutions.

Country

Madagascar  

Regions

Analamanga, Boeny and Diana 

Duration

01.2022-05.2022 (excluding May)

Summary

Description

The intensifying impacts of climate change in Madagascar threaten the livelihoods of local communities and the well-being of natural ecosystems. Since the negative impacts of climate change are already present in Madagascar and will further intensify over the upcoming decades it is a priority for Madagascar´s government to take the necessary adaptation measures for local adaptation planning. Within each region, Boeny, Diana and Anamalanga, a comprehensive risk assessment was conducted across various sectors including agriculture and livestock, water supply and sanitation, forest and biodiversity. In Analamanga, a specific assessment of infrastructure including the city of Antananarivo was undertaken, whereas in Boeny and Diana, the project extended its scope to encompass coastal areas and fisheries. 

Methodology

The risk assessment was conducted by Madagascar´s National Environmental Agency (ONE), based on the results of the previous assessment implemented by adelphi consultant GmbH. The procedure and methodology was oriented according to the Climate Vulnerability Sourcebook. The approach of using impact chains as explained in the Climate Vulnerability Sourcebook had the advantage of illustrating the complex inter-relations between hazards, exposure, vulnerabilities, and risks. To provide tailor-made solutions for the target region an adapted version to the Malagasy context was developed and used. Adaptation measures for each region and for the municipal level were identified. The method combined quantitative and qualitive data such as climate scenarios, climate indices and extremes on the one hand and workshops with experts, community consultations and field visits on the other hand.  

Key outputs

Here we exemplary present the results of the forest and biodiversity sector in the Diana region. 

The increase in duration of strong winds caused by trade winds (varatraza) and cyclones is the main climatic threat to the Diana region. Combined with changes in precipitation and increasing temperatures, these hazards have an adverse impact on biodiversity of the region. The main risks posed by these climatic hazards are: 

  • Habitat loss (forest, marine, and aquatic), species loss, and decline in timber and non-timber forest products (or forest biomass), 
  • the proliferation of invasive species and  
  • ecological imbalance. 

Climate Risk Map  

Figure 1: The region Diana and its location in Madagascar. In the large map the colors illustrate the following: red = high risk, orange = medium risk, yellow = low risk.

Impact chains

Figure 2: The impact chains illustrate the inter-relations and causal effects between hazards, indirect and direct risks and their differential consequences on other subsystems.

Documents

Standard-Elements of Climate Risk Analysis

Climate‐related hazards include any type of extreme weather events (e.g. heatwaves, droughts, extreme precipitation events, storms) as well as climate‐related slow‐onset processes (e.g. increasing temperatures, increasing aridity, acidification, glacier melt or sea‐level rise) that are triggering adverse consequences for human or ecological systems (see also https://www.adaptationcommunity.net/climate-risk-assessment-management/climate-risk-sourcebook/conceptual-framework).

Hazard category
Climate-related hazard factor
Heat and cold
Increase in average temperatures
Heat and cold
Decrease in average temperatures
Heat and cold
Increase in heatwaves
Heat and cold
Increase in frequency and intensity of extreme heat events
Heat and cold
Increase of concentration mixture of extreme heat + humidity
Heat and cold
Increase in cold spells (no. of cold days)
Heat and cold
Increase in frost events (no. of frost days)
Heat and cold
Increase in heating degree days
Heat and cold
Increase in cooling degree days
Heat and cold
Vegetation growing degree days
Wet and dry
Increase in average precipitation
Wet and dry
Decrease in average precipitation
Wet and dry
Change in precipitation patterns/variability
Wet and dry
Increase in dry days (no. of days)
Wet and dry
Increase in number of consecutive dry days
Wet and dry
Increase in extreme rainfall events (no. of days with heavy rain)
Wet and dry
Increase in frequency of extreme precipitation
Wet and dry
Increase in hailstorms
Wet and dry
Increase in drought events
Wet and dry
Increasingly erratic rainfall
Wet and dry
Lower annual mean river flows
Wet and dry
Higher river flows
Wet and dry
River floods
Wet and dry
Increased in flood events
Wet and dry
Increase in humidity
Wet and dry
Inreasing intensity of fire weather
Wet and dry
Long fire season
Snow/ice
Decrease in solid precipitation (snow)
Snow/ice
Decrease in snow cover (+ less melt water)
Snow/ice
Increase in heavy snowfall events
Snow/ice
Increase in snow storms
Snow/ice
Accelerated melting of glaciers
Snow/ice
Increasing permafrost thawing
Wind & Storm
Increase in strong winds
Wind & Storm
Increase in tropical cyclones/hurricanes
Wind & Storm
Increase in tornadoes
Coastal/Oceanic
Rising sea levels
Coastal/Oceanic
Increasing ocean acidification
Coastal/Oceanic
Increase in sea surface temperature
Coastal/Oceanic
Increase in ocean heatwaves
Coastal/Oceanic
Increase in storm surge events
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Vulnerability is the propensity or predisposition to be adversely affected and includes all relevant environmental, physical, technical, social, cultural, economic, institutional, or policy‐related factors. These contribute to and encompass a variety of concepts and elements, including sensitivity or susceptibility to harm, and/or lack of capacity to prevent, prepare, respond, cope and/or adapt (see also https://www.adaptationcommunity.net/climate-risk-assessment-management/climate-risk-sourcebook/conceptual-framework).

Vulnerability category
Vulnerability factor
Environmental
Steep slopes
Environmental
High drought sensitivity of crops
Environmental
Overgrazing
Environmental
Degredation of ecosystem services and functions
Environmental
Increasing number of livestock
Environmental
High vulnerability of freshwater faunae
Environmental
Urban heat islands
Environmental
Slow penetration and increasing cost of air conditioning
Environmental
Encroachment of urban areas into areas that retain water
Environmental
Increased concentrations of coastal urban population
Environmental
Insecticide resistance
Environmental
Unsuitable crop varieties
Environmental
High disease prevalence
Environmental
High prevalence of pests
Environmental
High prevalence of weeds
Environmental
High prevalence of land degradation
Environmental
High rates of deforestation
Environmental
Frequent bushfires
Environmental
Unfavourable soil conditions
Environmental
Water scarce area
Environmental
Poor access to drinking water (increased time and travel)
Environmental
No alternative access to freshwater resources
Environmental
Major component of local diet
Environmental
Reliance on rainfed agriculture
Environmental
High reliance on single sources of energy production
Environmental
Insufficient options for food supply from outside the region
Environmental
Lack of alternative energy supplies or battery storage
Environmental
Insufficient protection of the transport infrastructure
Environmental
Dependency on a single crop type
Environmental
Crop is highly susceptible to pests
Environmental
Crop is highly susceptible to diseases
Environmental
Animal/breed is highly susceptible to pests
Environmental
Animal/breed is highly susceptible to diseases
Environmental
Inappropriate river system management
Environmental
Underpreparedness of fisheries for geographic shifts in marine animals
Environmental
Poor efficiency of farming
Environmental
Demographic pressure on land
Environmental
Small farm size
Environmental
Dependency on groundwater
Environmental
Unsustainable natural resource use
Environmental
Lack of production alternatives
Environmental
Poor drainage
Environmental
Soil degredation
Environmental
Insufficient energy transmission infrastructure
Environmental
Aging forest stand
Environmental
Channeled river
Environmental
Soil erosion
Environmental
Increased nutrients from fertilizers
Environmental
Absence of river buffer zones
Environmental
River water abstractions
Environmental
Inadequate storage capacity
Environmental
Inadequate storage infrastructure
Environmental
Intensive tillage
Environmental
Lack of diversification in water resources
Environmental
High irrigation requirement
Environmental
Use of water intensive varieties
Environmental
Lack of flood protection infrastructure
Environmental
Lack of maintenance of protective infrastructure
Environmental
High reliance on hydropower for national electricity generation
Environmental
Lack of irrigation infrastructure
Environmental
Inappropriate irrigation infrastructure
Environmental
Lack of road infrastructure
Environmental
Lack of access to agricultural inputs
Environmental
Lack of access to improved crop varieties
Environmental
Lack of access to improved livestock breeds
Environmental
Habitat fragmentation
Environmental
Air and water pollution
Environmental
Competition from invasive species
Environmental
Species have evolved in very specific climate conditions
Environmental
Species and plants with limited dispersal capabilities
Environmental
Inappropriate pasture management
Environmental
Conflict prone area
Environmental
Predominantly small-scale subsistence farming
Environmental
Unsustainable agricultural practices
Environmental
Poor water use efficiency and management
Environmental
Poor efficiency of farming
Environmental
Reliance of farming community on manual agricultural labour
Environmental
Reliance of farming community on livestock, particularly cattle
Environmental
Limited uptake of modern technologies
Environmental
Inadequate housing and occupations with exposure to heat
Environmental
Weak land tenure and property rights
Environmental
Forced migration into cities (heat stress in urban areas)
Environmental
Inappropriate management of riverbeds and mudflow channels
Environmental
Low ability to manage, store and supply fresh water
Environmental
Inefficient reservoir management
Environmental
Small-scale food production
Social
Lack of access to a financial safety net (credit, financial savings, insurance, remittance, etc.)
Social
Lack of options for alternative incomes
Social
Inability to interpret climate information
Social
Deficits in risk communication
Social
Lack of appropriate information
Social
Lack of implementation of hazard-resistent building codes
Social
Lack of social networks
Social
Inequal treatment of women workers
Social
High poverty levels
Social
Poor hygiene conditions
Social
Weak land tenure and access rights for women
Social
Inappropriate governance or inadequate planning and implementation of water infrastructure
Social
Poor governance
Social
Poor sanitation governance
Social
Inadequate improvements in public health systems
Social
Poor state support
Social
Inconsistencies in policy implementation
Social
Missing hazard zone planning
Social
Lack of access to early warning systems
Social
Inadequate climate information services
Social
Uncertainties in future regional climate projections and low confidence in decision making
Social
Insufficient institutional support for adaptation and recovery, particularly for severe infrequent events
Social
Poor health
Social
Pre-existing health conditions exacerbated by exposure to smoke
Social
Lack of access to health facilities
Social
Unequal opportunities for women
Social
Low access to credit for women farmers
Social
Lack of knowledge on processing/value addition
Social
High illiteracy rates
Social
Low level of education
Social
Lack of access to education
Social
Inadequate agri research and development
Social
Lack of experience with extreme events and slow-onset processes
Social
Lack of implementation of risk and emergency planning
Social
Low perception of own risk
Social
Lack of land use planning
Social
Lack of willingness to relocate from flood-prone areas
Social
Lack of measures for flood protection and response on community level
Economic
Food insecurity already high
Economic
Limited trade and transport of food
Economic
Little investment in drainage solutions
Economic
Unstable commodity prices
Economic
Shortage of labour
Economic
Low access to markets
Economic
Low access to credit
Economic
High interest rates
Economic
Barriers to trade
Economic
Lack of access to market information
Economic
Low access to agricultural extension services
Economic
Lack of access to processing equipment
Economic
Unstable commodity prices
Economic
Producers with marginal assets
Economic
Reliance on aquatic products and tourism for livelihoods
Economic
Dependency on fisheries for income and nutrition
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Exposure describes first who or what is exposed. According to the IPCC, exposure is the presence of people, livelihoods, species or ecosystems, environmental functions, services, and resources, infrastructure, or economic, social, or cultural assets in places and settings that could be adversely affected (see also https://www.adaptationcommunity.net/climate-risk-assessment-management/climate-risk-sourcebook/conceptual-framework).

Exposure category
Exposure factor
Ecosystems
Plant and animal species
Ecosystems
Tropical forests
Ecosystems
Arctic tundra
Ecosystems
Southern tundra
Ecosystems
Increase of concentration mixture of extreme heat + humidity
Ecosystems
Coral reef ecosystems
Ecosystems
Fish
Ecosystems
Forests
Ecosystems
Shrublands
Ecosystems
Wetlands
Ecosystems
Marine ecosystems
Ecosystems
Terrestrial ecosystems
Ecosystems
Freshwater ecosystems
Ecosystems
Polar regions
Ecosystems
Mountain regions
Ecosystems
Mangrove forests
Ecosystems
Seagrass meadows
Ecosystems
Alpine ecosystems
Ecosystems
Alpine species
Ecosystems
Alpine woodland
Ecosystems
Kelp forests
Ecosystems
Sea ice habitats
Ecosystems
Nearshore ecosystems
Ecosystems
River ecosystems
Ecosystems
Estuarine ecosystems
Ecosystems
Mid- to low- elevation forests
Ecosystems
Grasslands
People
Population
People
Populations living in fire-prone areas
People
Population in coastal regions
People
Populations living in areas prone to reduced water availability
People
Populations living in flood plains
People
Populations with strong cultural identity links to water, snow and ice conditions
People
Populations living in urban areas
People
Farmers
People
Manual labourers
People
Outdoor workers
People
Populations in climate hotspots
People
Aquafarmers
People
Subsistence hunters and fishers
People
Communities in areas with permafrost
People
Built-upareas
Infrastructure
Infrastructure in coastal regions
Infrastructure
Energy infrastructure
Infrastructure
Urban infrastructure
Infrastructure
Buildings
Infrastructure
Transport infrastructure
Infrastructure
Water infrastructure
Infrastructure
Agricultural infrastructure
Infrastructure
Electricity infrastructure
Infrastructure
Health infrastructure
Cultural heritage
Cultural heritage sites
Cultural heritage
Cultural values
Services
Food system
Economy
Coastal fishery area
Economy
Agricultural land
Economy
Crop land
Economy
Livestock
Economy
Tourism providers
Economy
Touristic infrastructure
Economy
Companies
Economy
Operating sites
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Additional Resources (Guidelines, Tools and Data)

The table below lists some additional resources that are useful when conducting a climate risk assessment. 

Ressource nameThemeSectorTypeAreaDescriptionLink
A gender-responsive approach to climate-smart agriculture: Evidence and guidance for practitionersAdaptation, GenderAgricultureGuideline"This practice brief explains how to take into account the gender gap in agriculture in the development of site-specific climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices through the adoption of a gender-responsive approach. Criteria are given to assist in determining whether a gender-responsive approach has been used in the implementation of CSA practices.
Adaptation Community PlatformAdaptationGuidelineAdaptationcommunity.net provides information on applying approaches, methods and tools that facilitate the planning and implementation of adaptation action. Information, online sessions and trainings are offered on nine topics comprising: climate services, comprehensive climate risk management, the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process, mainstreaming of adaptation, ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA), agroecology, climate change and migration, private sector adaptation and monitoring and evaluation.
Adaptation Framework ToolAdaptationAgricultureToolAfricaThis framework enables project designers to assess cost-benefit, climate risk, farmer capacity, mitigation benefits and biodiversity using a multi-criteria analysis system. The system then selects the most effective adaptation measures by analysing climate change risks and impacts. The results produced by the framework then give a rationale directed at mobilising climate finance.
Africa RiskViewRiskAgriculture, Food securityToolAfricaAfrica RiskView was developed to translate globally-available rainfall data, crop parameters and livelihood information into food security outlooks. It calculates the cost of aid responses to improve financial planning and resource allocation. It also provides a technical support package for a potential pan-African Disaster Risk Pool, allowing participating countries to immediately access funds when faced with an extreme climatic event.
Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP)ImpactAgricultureToolGlobalAgricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) harmonises analyses of agricultural systems at the local to global scales and looks at current and future impacts. It provides new methods for integrating stakeholder-informed scenarios into global and regional assessments of current and future agriculture and food systems.
Agriculture Adaptation AtlasAdaptationAgricultureToolAfricaThe Agriculture Adaptation Atlas provides the user with information on climate risk levels (outputs are available as maps, charts and tables) for three time periods (baseline, 2030 and 2050) and associated solutions. The tool gives summary statistics for different spatial units (smallest is country level). In addition, geospatial data can be downloaded for hazards, exposure, adaptive capacity and solutions (i.e. adaptation options).
AQUASTATVulnerabilityWaterDataAfrica, Asia, Caribbean, Latin AmericaAQUASTAT allows users to access country statistics on water resources, water uses and agricultural water management. Other complementary databases available include irrigated crop calendars, sub-national irrigation areas databases, a database on dams and reservoirs and a water and agriculture- related institutions database.
AqueductImpactWaterData, ToolGlobalAqueduct is a tool for mapping current and future water related risks such as floods, droughts and stress. It enables decision-makers to compare national and subnational water risk, and to identify current and future water risk to agriculture and food security.
Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation tool (CCORAL)RiskToolCaribbeanCaribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation tool (CCORAL) is an online risk management toolbox with tools covering vulnerability assessment, risk assessment, adaptation option identification/appraisal, monitoring and evaluation, and awareness-raising. The risk screening tool allows the user to rapidly assess a project, plan or policy for climate-influence.
Catalogue of Drought Hazard and Risk ToolsImpactData, Guideline, ToolGlobalThe Drought Catalogue is an online catalogue of the majority of worldwide available drought hazard risk tools, including drought indices and datasets and software products. A document is provided to guide policy makers, project managers, and professionals in assessing drought hazards and risks.
CGIAR CSA GuideAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineGlobalThe website introduces the climate-smart agriculture (CSA) approach to food security and sustainable development and provides guidance on how to implement mitigation and adaptation initiatives.
Checklist: Gender-inclusive actionable agro-advisoriesAdaptation, GenderAgricultureGuidelineThis checklist assists in developing agro-advisories (forecast and forecast-based advice) that are gender-inclusive and useful for both men and women farmers. It presents five indicators to determine the actionability of such agro-advisories: i) What information is available?; ii) If it is available, is it accessible? iii) If available and accessible, is it on time? iv) If available, accessible, and on time, can end-users understand it? v) If available, accessible, timely, and understandable, is it useful?
Climate Adaptation in Rural Development (CARD) Assessment ToolRiskAgricultureToolAfrica, Central America and the Caribbean, Central Asia, China and Mongolia, Eastern Europe, Mainland Asia, Middle East, Pacific, South AmericaThe Climate Adaptation in Rural Development (CARD) Assessment Tool provides a platform for examining how climate change is affecting and is likely to affect the yields of 17 key crops across the 11 IFAD regions through to 2050. The tool is designed to provide quantitative data concerning climate risks faced by agricultural and rural development investments and strategies including economic and financial analyses.
Climate and Disaster Risk Screening ToolsRiskAgricultureToolThe World Bank’s Climate and Disaster Risk Screening Tools - Agriculture Projects screens agricultural projects for risks from climate variability and change, as well as geophysical disasters. The Rapid and In-Depth Screening Tools provide a systematic way to undertake due diligence and flag potential risks for projects in the agricultural sector. The tools guides the user via a step-by-step approach to identify potential risks at an early stage of project design.
Climate change 2022: Impacts, adaptation and vulnerabilityAdaptation, Impact, VulnerabilityPublicationGlobalChapters 9 to 15 of Working Group II's contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report assesses climate change impacts, risks, vulnerability and the enabling environments, barriers and options for adaptation and climate resilient development per macro region.
Climate Change Knowledge Portal (CCKP)Climate DataDataGlobalThe Climate Change Knowledge Portal (CCKP) is the hub for climate-related information, data, and tools for the World Bank Group. It provides global data on historic and future climate impacts and vulnerabilities as well as disaster risks, and socio-economic factors. The data can be explored via national, sub-national and watershed views. The data is also synthesised in easily accessible Climate Risk Country Profiles which describe sector specific climate change impacts.
Climate Change ProfilesAdaptation, VulnerabilityDataBangladesh, Benin, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, East African Great Lakes and Ruzizi Plain, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lebanon, Palestinian territories, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda, West African Sahel, YemenThe profiles provide information on countries' vulnerabilities to climate change, their policies and commitments in place, and the climate change interventions which are financed with international assistance. The profiles aim to assist with incorporating climate actions into development cooperation policies and activities.
Climate change risk assessments in value chain projectsGender, RiskAgricultureGuidelineThis document provides a means for introducing climate risk analysis into the design phase of a value chain project. It follows 5 key steps: 1. identifying the value chain; 2. identifying key climate risks along the chain; 3. choosing effective mitigation measures; 4. targeting the people most vulnerable to risk; and, 5. reaching scale.
Climate risk analyses in Southern and Central AfricaRiskAgriculturePublicationSouthern and Central AfricaA series of eight climate risk analysis reports covering countries in Southern and Central Africa namely, Angola, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The reports identify staple crops grown in each country and the suitability of the crops with projected changes in rainfall and temperature through to 2050. The reports focus on crops grown by subsistence farmers and make climate change projections at a provincial production level.
Climate risk assessment for ecosystem-based adaptation – a guidebook for planners and practitionersRiskNatural environmentGuidelineThis guidebook assists planners and practitioners in designing and implementing climate risk assessments in the context of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) projects. It provides a standardised approach to assess climate risks within social-ecological systems based on two application examples (river basin and coastal zone management).
Climate Risk Country ProfilesRiskAgriculture, Economic, Energy, Health, Natural environment, WaterDataThe Climate Risk Country Profiles provide a high-level assessment of climate risks for countries globally. They inform decision-makers of the potential for increasing and emerging risks in accordance with different climate futures. The profiles describe climate change impacts to key sectors such as agriculture, energy and health.
Climate Risk Screening and Management ToolsRiskAgriculture, Economy, Health, Infrastructure, Natural environment, WaterToolThe USAID website provides climate risk screening and management tools for application during the design phase of strategies, projects and activities. It includes an 'agriculture annex' which gives examples of climate risks, adaptive capacity, opportunities and management options.
Climate-smart agriculture investment plan development guide: From concept to actionAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineThis guide assists the user in developing a climate-smart agriculture investment plan (CSAIP). The process involves a situation analysis, the prioritisation of potential CSA investments, and the identification of means for implementing and monitoring project investments. Stakeholder engagement and capacity development are key components of the process. The result is a set of evidence-based and context appropriate interventions for investors to consider.
Climate-Smart Agriculture Rapid Appraisal (CSA-RA) ToolAdaptation, GenderAgricultureTool"The Climate-Smart Agriculture Rapid Appraisal (CSA-RA) tool provides a means for assessment of opportunities and key barriers to climate-smart agriculture adoption across landscapes by collecting gender-disaggregated data, perceptions of climate variability and resource and labour allocation,
Climate-Smart Agriculture SourcebookAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineGlobalThe Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) Sourcebook provides information on the concept of CSA to guide policy makers, programme managers, sectoral experts, academics, extensionists, and practitioners in making agriculture (crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry) more sustainable and productive, whilst simultaneously responding to climate-related challenges.
Climate, Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Integration Guidance (CEDRIG)RiskToolClimate, Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Integration Guidance (CEDRIG) is an open-access online tool integrating climate, environment and disaster risk reduction (DRR) to assess climate risks and/or impacts of projects, plans or programmes. CEDRIG uses an integrated approach to assess the risks for, and the unintended potential negative impacts of, a new strategy, programme or project. It provides three different types of assessment - 'light' for rapid risk and impact screening, and 'strategic' and 'operational' assessments for a detailed approach and integration into existing or planned strategies or programmes.
Conservation AgricultureAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineGlobalThis website explains the concept of conservation agriculture, its benefits, how to implement it, case studies describing its application and links to further resources.
Conservation StandardsRiskNatural environmentGuidelineOpen Standards for the Practice of Conservation provides a set of best practices for the implementation of conservation projects. The latest version, version 4.0, released in 2020, addresses climate change considerations in more detail, with new tools developed for adaptation.
Copernicus Climate Data StoreClimate DataDataGlobalThe Copernicus Climate Data Store provides global climate reanalysis data (1950 to present) which is hourly and monthly averaged, seasonal forecasts, climate projections, and observational data, amongst others. Datasets can be searched temporally (future, past or present) and by sector.
Cost-benefit analysis of prioritized climate-smart agricultural practices among smallholder farmers: evidence from selected value chains across Sub-Saharan AfricaAdaptationAgricultureGuideline, Journal articleSub-Saharan AfricaThis article provides a multi-dimensional framework to assess prioritised climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices adopted by smallholder farmers across different value chains in Sub-Saharan Africa. The economic feasibility of the practices were evaluated using cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The combination of the CSA prioritisation framework and CBA ensures the selection of the most viable and cost-effective CSA practices for resource allocation.
CSA-Plan: strategies to put climate-smart agriculture (CSA) into practiceAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineThis document provides guidance on implementing climate-smart agriculture (CSA) in agricultural development through the CSA Plan approach. CSA-Plan comprises four key components: (i) situation analysis, (ii) targeting and prioritising, (iii) programme design, and (iv) monitoring and evaluation. Each component involves a variety of approaches to address challenges that obstruct planning and progress. CSA indicators are given to provide an evidence base for decision-making, implementation, and monitoring components.
Economics of climate adaptation (ECA) - Guidebook for practitionersRiskGuidelineThis document presents a climate risk assessment approach to inform climate adaptation investments. The approach combines risk assessment, adaptation measures and risk transfer and its results allow for the identification of cost-effective climate adaptation measures for a variety of projects and sectors.
Ecosystem-based adaptationAdaptationAgriculture, Forestry, Natural environmentGuidelineThis website provides a briefing note series, links to toolkits, additional resources and case studies on ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA). It also provides access to information on over 45 EbA projects located globally.
Ecosystem-based adaptation in agricultureAdaptationAgricultureGuidelineThis document introduces the concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) and gives relevant agricultural practices for climate change related environmental, economic and social impacts. It provides two case studies (Cambodia and Sudan) on EbA application and links to further resources.
Ecosystem-based adaptation in the agriculture sectorAdaptationAgriculture, Fisheries and aquaculture, ForestryGuideline"This document provides key nature-based solutions for adaptation in the food and agricultural sector as given in countries’ nationally determined contributions (NDCs). Best case practices showcasing the solutions can be viewed in presentations and videos here: http://www.fao.org/in-action/kore/news-and-events/news-details/en/c/1052870/
Effectively targeting climate investments: A methodology for mapping climate–agriculture–gender inequality hotspotsVulnerabilityAgricultureGuidelineGlobalThis document provides a methodology for identifying, ranking and mapping climate–agriculture–gender inequality hotspots. Climate–agriculture–gender inequality hotspots are geographical areas where high levels of climate hazards intersect with high levels of women’s participation in agriculture (exposure) and high levels of women’s vulnerability due to prevailing gender inequalities.
Evidence for Resilient AgricultureAdaptationAgriculture, Energy, Fisheries and aquaculture, Forestry, WaterDataAfricaThe Evidence for Resilient Agriculture (ERA) platform provides data and tools on the performance of agricultural technologies to assist users in making informed decisions. It provides evidence on the effects of changing from one technology to another, looking specifically at productivity, system resilience and climate change mitigation.
Gender Inequality Index (GII)Gender, VulnerabilityDataGlobalThe Gender Inequality Index (GII) provides a metric of gender inequality that addresses three key dimensions: reproductive health, empowerment and the labour market. A high GII value indicates high inequality between women and men.
Green Innovation Centres for the agriculture and food sectorAdaptation, VulnerabilityAgriculturePublicationAfrica, Asia, South East AsiaThe series of reports provide climate and vulnerability analyses of Green Innovation Centre (GIC) target commodity value chains. The reports identify climate-related vulnerabilities, hazards, and adaptation options. Climate hazards and crop suitability modelling indicate potential future scenarios under climate change and prioritised adaptation solutions are given.
INFORMVulnerabilityDataGlobalINFORM provides a suite of quantitative, analytical products to support decision-making on humanitarian crises and disasters. The INFORM Risk Index provides risk assessments on a national and sub-national (province, municipality, village) level, giving indicators for hazard, exposure, vulnerability and lack of coping capacity.
IPCC WGI Interactive AtlasClimate DataDataGlobalThe IPCC WGI Interactive Atlas enables temporal and spatial analyses of trends and changes in key atmospheric and oceanic variables, extreme indices and climatic impact-drivers, as obtained from several global and regional observation and model-simulated datasets used in the IPCC WGI report. Two interfaces are available: a simple interface for the general public, media, teaching and decision-makers and an advanced interface for researchers and practitioners.
IRI/Columbia Climate Data LibraryClimate DataDataGlobalThe IRI/Columbia Climate Data Library is an online data repository and analysis tool that allows users to view, analyse and download climate-related data. Present climate conditions can be monitored and analysed using Maproom. Data can be presented in visually interesting formats such as animation.
Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)ImpactAgriculture, Forestry, WaterToolThis tool provides an interdisciplinary approach to assessing climate change impacts at the national level. Its aim is to expand the knowledge of experts in climate change impacts and assist policy makers in developing informed adaptation strategies and development projects and investments.
NOAA Climate Data OnlineClimate DataDataGlobalNOAA Climate Data Online provides free access to global historic weather and climate data in addition to station history information.
Notre Dame-Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN)VulnerabilityDataGlobalThe Notre Dame-Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) Country Index indicates a country´s vulnerability to climate change and readiness to improve resilience, as well as the ND-Gain, a third index computed by subtracting the vulnerability score from the readiness score. This comprehensive index considers large amounts of data, covering a long time span and has a global extent. It aims to assist governments, businesses and communities to better prioritise investments for a more efficient response to global challenges.
Participatory Assessment of Climate and Disaster Risk (PACDR)RiskToolThe Participatory Assessment of Climate and Disaster Risk (PACDR) tool comprises seven modules which when combined allow users to incorporate climate and disaster risk into the planning of development projects at a community level. The tool combines information from the local community as well as scientific knowledge related to climate change in order to identify context specific risks. It guides the user through the community assessment of both climate and disaster risks and opportunities. The assessment can then inform ongoing or planned projects and programmes and community planning.
PIEVC Green Protocol — Integrating ecosystem-based adaptation into infrastructure climate risk assessmentsRiskInfrastructureGuidelineThe PIEVC Green Protocol was developed to assist practitioners in understanding the risk of climate change to infrastructure whilst taking into account the wider socio-ecological system. It also addresses the potential impacts on the social-ecological system should infrastructure be disrupted or damaged.
Platform for Agricultural Risk Management (PARM)Gender, RiskAgriculturePublicationAfricaThe Platform for Agricultural Risk Management aims to share knowledge and build capacity in agricultural risk management to improve vulnerable rural households' abilities to contribute to better agricultural systems. The documents guide on how to conduct an Agricultural Value Chain Risk Assessment Study (AVC-RAS) at the national level in a gender responsive way.
Resilience rating system: A methodology for building and tracking resilience to climate changeRiskGuidelineThe Resilience Rating System provides information to decision-makers, investors, and other stakeholders on the resilience of projects. It gives guidance and criteria to assess the confidence that a project will meet anticipated investment outcomes by assessing whether a project has incorporated climate and disaster risks in its development and means of adaptation. It also rates a project based on its contribution to adaptive development and whether the investments are aligned with increasing climate resilience in the larger scale.
Risk Information Exchange (RiX)RiskDataAfrica, Eastern Europe, Middle East, South America, South Asia, South East AsiaRisk Information Exchange (RiX) aggregates over 600 global and national risk datasets spanning hazard, vulnerability, exposure, and climate change. Key information is geo-tagged and mapped in a visualisation tool. It aims to harmonise risk information to enable risk analyses by governments, the private sector, and other actors for improved decision making and resilience building.
Risk Stress Test ToolRiskToolThe Risk Stress Test (RiST) tool is an Excel-based tool which has been developed to assist with the stress testing analysis described in the methodological note 'Integrating Climate Change and Natural Disasters in the Economic Analysis of Projects: A disaster and climate risk stress methodology'. The tool highlights risks to project outcomes in the long term and identifies risks resulting from changing climate conditions, impacts of natural disasters, and changes in the frequency and intensity of natural disasters.
Synergies and trade-offs between climate change adaptation options and gender equalityAdaptation, GenderJournal articleThis journal article discusses the gender responsiveness of climate change adaptation options. It discusses policy actions and priorities, such as gender-sensitive project design, that can reduce/eliminate some of the trade-offs that adaptation can have on gender equality. It provides policy and action priorities for adaptation projects to improve gender equality.
Technical guidance on comprehensive risk assessment and planning in the context of climate changeRiskGuidelineThis document assists disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation decision-makers, practitioners and stakeholders in developing more responsive plans and policies. The document provides a framework on how to apply comprehensive risk assessment and planning.  It acknowledges that risks in the context of climate change are complex and systemic due to non-linear interactions amongst system components and the need for improved risk governance. The guidance can be contextualised to national and local needs.
The Adaptation Support Tool AdaptationToolThis is a six-step tool for assisting policy makers at the national level in developing, implementing and monitoring climate change adaptation strategies and plans. It also supports sub-national actors in preparing for, developing, implementing and monitoring and evaluating adaptation strategies.
The Assessment of Impacts and Risks of Climate Change on Agriculture (AIRCCA) ModelRiskAgricultureToolAfricaThis tool is an Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) for producing impact scenarios and risk metrics for the four main Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emission scenarios. The tool allows decision-makers and stakeholders to conduct global assessments on the climate change impacts on maize, wheat and rice production.
The Risk Supplement to the Vulnerability SourcebookRiskGuidelineThe Fifth IPCC Assessment Report (AR5) replaced the previous concept of vulnerability with the concept of risk of climate change impacts. This risk concept has been adopted from the approach and practices of risk assessment in the disaster risk reduction community. To bridge the gap between the two concepts, a Risk Supplement (2017) was developed in 2017. This document provides a step-by-step guide on how to implement a vulnerability assessment using the AR5 risk concept.
ThinkHazard!ImpactToolGlobalThinkHazard! is a tool which enables non-specialists to identify the impacts of climatic disasters on new development projects. It considers the likelihood and severity (low, medium or high) of occurrence of hazards in a specific country, province or district. ThinkHazard! also provides resources on how best to mitigate the identified risks and gives a projected view on how the risks may change in the future.
World Bank Open DataGender, VulnerabilityCrops, Economic, Energy, Forestry, Health, Livestock, Natural environmentDataGlobalWorld Bank Open Data is a database containing relevant information on agriculture and rural development, climate change, education, environment, gender, poverty and social development, amongst other topics, which can be used to understand the vulnerabilities of a chosen country or region to climate change.
Ressource nameThemeSectorTypeAreaDescriptionLink
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