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The purpose of this report is twofold: to illustrate the importance of integrating gender considerations in EbA actions and to provide concrete examples of how this can be done in practice. It is designed for EbA practitioners and adaptation policy-makers, including government decision-makers and technical support staff, civil society organisations, private sector enterprises, and research institutions.
This report from the publication series 'Green Recovery for Practitioners' presents a compilation of 23 examples that show how communities, cities and countries have implemented the idea of a green recovery. Covering a wide range of sectors, entry levels and approaches, it draws upon measures and instruments that have been deployed in more than 20 countries, particularly in developing and emerging economies. Each example reflects on the actors involved, the progress made and the lessons learned so far.
The Eastern Caribbean region is currently faced with a dilemma: On the one hand, the region is struggling with the management of the COVID-19 pandemic which has necessitated extended State of Emergency periods with established curfews and other measures to encourage people to stay home, practice social distancing and move as little as possible. Also, borders are largely closed, hence, the Free Movement of People Regime in the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) region is restricted due to COVID-19. These situations imply that people cannot move within the region and internal movements are also restricted. On the other hand, the OECS region is expecting an above-average active hurricane season which, based on past experience, might require people to move within their countries or across borders as a result of hurricanes or other climate-related events. These two different crises demand contrasting kinds of action: remaining versus moving.
The CRED Practitioner's Guide offers a framework to help economic advisers in central and sectoral government ministries to integrate climate economic modelling results in economic development processes, with the ultimate objective to support climate-resilient economic development. The guide describes various opportunities to integrate climate modelling results along all steps of the economic development policy cycle, from planning to budgeting and financing, implementation, and monitoring, evaluation, and learning.
With a particular focus on the role of development cooperation, impacts of climate change on the ocean and coastal zones were discussed during the expert dialogue ‘The ocean in a changing climate: Rapidly growing risk of loss and damage?’ hosted by GIZ Global Programme on Risk Assessment and Manage­ment for Adaptation to Climate Change (Loss & Damage) in January 2021. Key insights from the event are presented in this report.
La relance verte est un terme largement utilisé pour désigner les trains de mesures visant à pallier les conséquences sociales, économiques et politiques de la crise de COVID-19 d’une manière qui ouvre la voie à des réformes structurelles à long terme et à un changement de cap vers la durabilité, la protection de la biodiversité, la résilien¬ce et la neutralité climatique. Elle peut être réalisée par le biais de diverses institutions et approches juridiques et politiques, notamment en s’appuyant sur les outils existants mis au point dans le cadre des approches établies de l’économie verte.
Understaning and explaining what Ecosystem-based Adaptation is can be tricky. This new facthseet developed by the Global project Mainstreaming EbA provides you with a brief overview and a simple visualization to help make the term EbA more clear. It also relates EbA to the now often discussed term 'Nature-based Solutions' and thereby offers an easy to remember bridge to avoid confusion. 
The Global Project Mainstreaming EbA is a knowledge management project supports actors at international, national and local level to incorporate ecosystem-based adaptation into policy and planning processes of different sectors.  A focus of the project lies on knowledge management within an international EbA community of practice. With the help of additional networks, the global EbA project has developed a variety of concepts, strategies, methods and tools to promote EbA and to inform adaptation negotiations, policies, strategies and action plans. 
C‘est un enjeu fondamental pour l’avenir de l’humanité de nourrir une population mondiale en augmentation constante, tout en respectant les limites de la planète. Les modèles dominants de production et de consommation entraînent la perte des bases d’existence naturelles et détruisent les écosystèmes et leur fonctionnement. En 2017, 820 millions de personnes souffraient de sous-alimentation. Le changement climatique renforce cette tendance et pousse les écosystèmes naturels jusqu’aux limites de leur capacité de charge, entraînant ainsi de graves conséquences pour l’environnement, l’économie et les êtres humains. Afin d’assurer la survie de l’humanité, il est nécessaire de rendre les systèmes agro-alimentaires plus durables et plus résilients au climat.
La transformation de l’agriculture et des systèmes alimentaires mondiaux est une tâche centrale pour les années à venir. Garantir la sécurité alimentaire d’une population mondiale croissante, maintenir des écosystèmes sains pour soutenir les revenus et l’économie, limiter les risques climatiques et diminuer les émissions de gaz à effet de serre sont les principaux objectifs de systèmes agricoles et alimentaires (agroalimentaires) pérennes.  Compte tenu de la complexité de cette question, l’agroécologie (AE) s’est imposée dans le débat scientifique et politique comme un paradigme essentiel à y répondre.
The climate crisis and threats to food security are strongly interlinked. Global food and land use systems account for 21-37% of global greenhouse gas emissions and are one of the main drivers of climate change. On the other hand, agricultural production systems are very vulnerable to climate hazards, which are accelerated by climate change. Without action, yield reductions of up to 30% are expected. A rising population further increases food demand. To tackle this problem, adapting agricultural production systems to climate change is an indispensable step. Agroecology provides one solution that aims at developing sustainable land use and food systems and transforming them towards climate resilience and adaptiveness.
Agroecology is an approach that aims at developing sustainable land use and food systems and transforming them towards climate resilience and adaptiveness. The transformation of global agricultural and food systems is a central task of the coming years. Suitable solutions require the integration of as many system components as possible – from food cultivation, processing and trade, through consumers and their behaviour, to the relevant political and social environment.
The 6-step climate risk assessment (CRA) methodology provides practitioners and decision-makers with a guidance on how to assess climate-related risks and how to translate the assessment into measures. Main characteristics of the methodology include the participation of all stakeholders, the assessment of hazards along the entire spectrum from slow onset processes to extreme weather events, the consideration of non-economic losses and damages as well as the focus on risk tolerance levels. It aims at identifying a smart mix of climate risk management measures, combining proven instruments from climate change adaptation and disaster risk management with innovative instruments to address residual risks which cannot be averted. As such, CRA can support evidence-based and risk-informed decision making and planning in the context of climate change.
The CRED Factsheet introduces in the IKI program Policy Advice for Climate-Resilient Economic Development. The factsheet explains the need to assess climate risks and improve adaptation measures. It illustrates the CRED approach in developing human and technical capacities in macro-economic modelling of climate risks in the economic and planning ministries in Kazakhstan, Vietnam and Georgia. This aims at central macro-economic strategies and policies, supporting the implementation of NDC goals and national adaptation plans (NAP).
The CRED Project Brief gives an overview in how to manage economic risks of climate change by macro-economic modelling. The Project Brief introduces the three macro-economic models applied in the three partner countries Kazakhstan, Vietnam and Georgia. It explains how these models support the countries and its political institutions in developing climate-sensitive development plans and economic development strategies by translating the modelling results in evidence-based country specific policies.
The following guidance note presents “why” and “how” the NAP process can be utilized as a key mechanism and driver to mainstream and upscale EbA. It is based on a recent analysis of 19 completed NAP documents that reviewed the inclusion of ecosystems and uptake of EbA measures. The document builds on the lessons learned from the review and identifies guiding principles and actions accordingly. It also presents an overview of ecosystems, ecosystem services and their role in adaptation, and how managing their transformation under a changing climate can contribute to reducing climate risks and impacts for both people and ecosystems. Furthermore, it focuses on guiding principles and recommended actions along the steps of the NAP process to integrate and enhance EbA.
National Adaptation Plan (NAP) processes present a strategic opportunity to raise the profile of EbA approaches, providing a framework—and, potentially, financial resources—for implementation at scale. Based on this , the NAP Global Network undertook a review of 19 NAP documents to better understand the extent to which EbA, as a tool for adaptation, has been taken up in NAP processes. This analysis highlights the extent of integration and identification of ecosystems and EbA into National Adaptation Plans (NAPs), trends in how EbA was incorporated, and opportunities to strengthen the profile and quality of EbA.
The international EbA Community of Practice aims at knowledge and experience sharing and mutual learning beyond projects, institutions and regional boundaries on Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA). Its purpose is to jointly develop harmonized approaches, evidence-based lessons learned and best practices for how to plan and implement effective EbA to help people adapt to the adverse effects of climate change through a collaborative learning process.
Accompanying the expert conference “Building Climate Resilience – How can comprehensive climate risk management avert, minimise and address losses and damages?” that was held in Lao PDR in late November 2019, the GP Risk Assessment and Management initiated tree planting activities at four local schools in rural Lao PDR that are implemented under the Village Forest Management Component of the CliPAD programme.
This factsheet provides an overview of scenario planning as an approach to deal with migration, displacement and planned relocation in the context of climate change. Scenario planning is a method that involves a wide range of stakeholders and serves as a tool for developing a range of future scenarios based on multiple factors and influences. The Global Programme Human Mobility in the Context of Climate Change implemented by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH has successfully applied scenario planning methods with its partners in the Caribbean, Pacific and the Philippines. In this context, valuable insights and important options for action could be identified.
The Lead the Change Programme is a product of the Regional Project on Ecosystem-based Adaptation to Climate Change in the high mountainous region of Central Asia, implemented by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) through the International Climate Initiative (IKI). This document synthesizes the learnings from a Leadership Programme conducted in 2017. Its aim is to provide inspiration and practical guidance on how to develop and manage a cross-sectoral leadership development programme in the context of sustainability. It is written for commissioning organisations as well as programme managers and facilitators designing such programmes. Whilst it outlines the concept, methodological approach and design of the programme, it is however not a facilitation guide, but rather works in conjunction with related documents such as the AIZ’s Toolbox Leadership for Global Responsibility and assumes proficiency of the facilitators in the faculties and methodologies outlined.
This study explores how the two leading approaches in water resources management and ecosystem thinking for climate change adaptation – i.e. IWRM and EbA – can be merged to achieve greater climate resilience in watersheds. It entails a conceptual analysis of both approaches and showcases nine practical implementation examples of integrated EbA-IWRM projects around the world. The case studies reveal structural similarities, key lessons, and enabling and inhibiting factors for integrated EbA-IWRM approaches. From this, the study derives and promotes a set of guiding principles for integrated EbA-IWRM projects.
Green recovery is a widely used term for packages of measures addressing the social, economic and political consequences of the Covid-19 crisis in a way that sets the course for a shift towards sustainable and inclusive development, biodiversity protection, resilience and climate neutrality. This paper provides a practical framework that captures the key elements of a green recovery to inform the work of practitioners who seek to support sustainable, inclusive, and resilient recoveries.