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Cette évaluation décrit sept facteurs d’impact climatique importants pour la Tunisie, avec un accent particulier sur les gouvernorats de Béja, Jendouba, Kairouan, Kasserine, Kef, Sidi Bouzid et Siliana. Elle montre comment les facteurs d’impact climatique devraient changer selon deux trajectoires de changement climatique à l’avenir (2030, 2050 et 2080).
Cette évaluation décrit sept facteurs d’impact climatique importants pour le Burkina Faso, avec un accent particulier sur les provinces du Houet et du Tuy dans la région des Hauts-Bassins. Elle montre comment les facteurs d’impact climatique devraient changer selon deux trajectoires de changement climatique à l’avenir (2030, 2050 et 2080).
Cette évaluation décrit sept facteurs d’impact climatique importants pour le Bénin, avec un accent particulier sur les régions d’Alibori, de Bourgou, des Collines et du Zou. Elle montre comment les facteurs d’impact climatique devraient changer selon deux trajectoires de changement climatique à l’avenir (2030, 2050 et 2080).
This assessment describes seven important climatic impact drivers for India, with a special focus on the districts Ahmadnagar, Amravati, Dhule, Jalna and Yavatmal in the state of Maharashtra and Mandla and Balaghat in the state of Madhya Pradesh. It shows how the climatic impact drivers are projected to change under two climate change trajectories in the future (2030, 2050 and 2080).
This assessment describes seven important climatic impact drivers for Kenya, with a special focus on the counties Bungoma, Kakamega and Siaya. It shows how the climatic impact drivers are projected to change under two climate change trajectories in the future (2030, 2050 and 2080).
This assessment describes seven important climatic impact drivers for Ethiopia, with a special focus on the regions Afar; Amhara; Oromia; Southern Nations, Nationalities, And Peoples´ Region (SNNP) and Tigray. It shows how the climatic impact drivers are projected to change under two climate change trajectories in the future (2030, 2050 and 2080).
There is an unprecedented interest in nature-based solutions for climate change mitigation and adaptation. But something very important is often missing from discussions of such solutions: the role of healthy soils. As habitats for plants and animals, as regulators of climate and water, and as the foundation of terrestrial ecosystems and the vast majority of our food production, soils are critical to all ecosystem services – including those that humans depend on for survival. This guidebook aims to demonstrate the importance of sustainable soil management (SSM) for adaptation to climate change, biodiversity conservation and the achievement of long-term food security. By adopting nature-based solutions such as ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA), farmers can dramatically increase their productivity while adapting to climate risks.
Based on a database that also builds the foundation of the search engine CRAMSE, this study aims to increase the understanding of recent innovations, and of remaining methodological challenges to future innovation in climate risk assessments. Six dimensions relevant to the challenges of CRAs in the context of climate-related losses and damages are evaluated in detail, ideally benefiting decision makers’ selection of suitable methods and practitioners’ efforts to further develop future methods and approaches.
Slow onset processes and extreme weather events related to global warming are driving human mobility in context of climate change. Due to related extremes and slowly evolving processes such as floods, droughts, and rising sea-level, increasingly more livelihoods are destroyed, homes become inhabitable and economic opportunities are mitigated, resulting in migration, displacement, and planned relocation. To reduce those adverse effects related to climate change, the implementation of timely and diversified financing is needed. Therefore, this fact sheet presents different relevant finance sources and instruments in terms of their linkage to human mobility in the context of climate change, including reflections on gender aspects and recommendations for decision-makers.
The Leaving Place, Restoring Home studies have identified over 400 cases of planned relocation across the globe. What are the characteristics of planned relocation, and the opportunities and challenges associated with it? In what ways can it support durable solutions for people vulnerable to disasters and climate change? What can the Leaving Place, Restoring Home studies add to our understanding of planned relocation?
This compendium comprises an overview and analysis of gender approaches for different pathways of climate-induced mobility, working with six case studies on migration, displacement, and planned relocation. By presenting relevant lessons, best practices, tools, recommendations and resources to practitioners, a knowledge basis is provided for enhancing the gender-sensitive and sustainable management of human mobility in the context of climate change within the Philippines.
Slow onset processes and extreme weather events related to global warming are driving human mobility in context of climate change (HMCCC). Due to related extremes and slowly evolving processes such as floods, droughts, and rising sea-level, increasingly more livelihoods are destroyed, homes become inhabitable and economic opportunities are mitigated, resulting in migration, displacement, and planned relocation. To reduce those adverse effects related to climate change, the implementation of timely and diversified financing is needed. Therefore, with a focus on developing countries, this study presents and reflects on different relevant finance sources and instruments in terms of their linkage to HMCCC, effect on climate risks, implementation timing, and gender aspects. 10 finance instruments and tools that address HMCCC have been selected with a non-exhaustive approach for analysis, coming from a range of international, public, and private sources. Additionally, the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on financing flows and options for HMCCC has been considered in an exclusive chapter. The study closes with recommendations for different target groups, especially national governments, and donor organizations.
Sustainable development, climate change adaptation, and mitigation are inextricably interconnected, with potential for conflicts and trade-offs, as well as synergies and co-benefits. This policy brief aims to build on a series of recent peer learning events focused on addressing climate change through integrated responses by linking adaptation and mitigation at the planning and implementation stages.
Building on existing literature, investigations, and available project information, this reflection paper attempts a better understanding of how a comprehensive CRM can positively contribute to specific SDGs, adding value to ongoing discussions by examining both existing and potential synergies between CRM measures and the SDGs. Multiple synergies between CRM and the SDGs are identified; while CRM aims at fostering a holistic understanding and consideration of past and future climate change impacts in all affected sectors as well as needs and opportunities to manage possible losses and damages, sustainable development itself contributes to strengthened climate resilience.
The effects of climate change and increasing extreme weather events on the oceans are key challenges for small-scale fisheries. This factsheet highlights some of the economic as well as non-economic losses and damages associated with these effects for the region of the South Pacific . It summarises findings from a global study which aims at developing a better understanding of the impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries to identify suitable risk-management-solutions, and to show entry points for climate risk management (CRM) in order to enhance resilience.
The effects of climate change and increasing extreme weather events on the oceans are key challenges for small-scale fisheries. This factsheet highlights some of the economic as well as non-economic losses and damages associated with these effects for the region of West Africa. It summarises findings from a global study which aims at developing a better understanding of the impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries to identify suitable risk-management-solutions, and to show entry points for climate risk management (CRM) in order to enhance resilience.
The effects of climate change and increasing extreme weather events on the oceans are key challenges for small-scale fisheries. This factsheet highlights some of the economic as well as non-economic losses and damages associated with these effects for the region of the Caribbean. It summarises findings from a global study which aims at developing a better understanding of the impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries to identify suitable risk-management-solutions, and to show entry points for climate risk management (CRM) in order to enhance resilience.
This factsheet summarises the findings of the study. The Caribbean is extensively exposed to disasters caused by natural events. Especially, increasing tropical cyclone intensities pose a key coastal and ocean climate change risk. This study offers insights into coastal risks in the Caribbean and identifies trends of adaptation options and their effectiveness to reduce economic damages. With the approach designed in this study, it could be shown that trends of averted (economic) damages can be calculated with CLIMADA, supporting the selection processes of an effective mix of measures for climate risk management.
The study region of the Caribbean is extensively exposed to disasters caused by natural events. Especially, increasing tropical cyclone intensities pose a key coastal and ocean risk to Caribbean LDCs and SIDS. This study offers insights into coastal risks in the Caribbean and identifies trends of adaptation options and their effectiveness to reduce economic damages. With the approach designed in this study, it could be shown that trends of averted (economic) damages can be calculated with CLIMADA, supporting the selection processes of an effective mix of measures for climate risk management.
While extreme weather events (EWE) have been given due prominence in risk management, slow-onset processes (SOP) such as sea level rise or desertification have so far been less well considered. This working paper lays out definitions, key challenges, and opportunities for understanding risk and generating resilience to SOP. It describes a Climate Risk Management framework developed for this purpose, and sets out key areas for collaboration across research and develop¬ment cooperation.
This concept paper introduces and explains the GP L&D’s Climate Risk Management (CRM) framework to avert, minimise, and address climate-related losses and damages in the most comprehensive way. It provides detailed information on the different steps of CRM, from risk assessment to the identification of a context-specific, complementary mix of measures as well as monitoring and evaluation and continuous learning.
This report explores challenges and action areas for advancing green fiscal policies – in response to the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond. It assesses the fiscal response to the pandemic and looks at examples and practical steps for (1) reforming fiscal rules (2) establishing green public financial management, (3) introducing carbon pricing, and (4) developing capacities and networks to integrate recovery efforts across fiscal and environmental spheres.