• English
  • French

PUBLICATIONS

  • Topics

  • Types

The Global Project Mainstreaming EbA is a knowledge management project supports actors at international, national and local level to incorporate ecosystem-based adaptation into policy and planning processes of different sectors.  A focus of the project lies on knowledge management within an international EbA community of practice. With the help of additional networks, the global EbA project has developed a variety of concepts, strategies, methods and tools to promote EbA and to inform adaptation negotiations, policies, strategies and action plans. 
C‘est un enjeu fondamental pour l’avenir de l’humanité de nourrir une population mondiale en augmentation constante, tout en respectant les limites de la planète. Les modèles dominants de production et de consommation entraînent la perte des bases d’existence naturelles et détruisent les écosystèmes et leur fonctionnement. En 2017, 820 millions de personnes souffraient de sous-alimentation. Le changement climatique renforce cette tendance et pousse les écosystèmes naturels jusqu’aux limites de leur capacité de charge, entraînant ainsi de graves conséquences pour l’environnement, l’économie et les êtres humains. Afin d’assurer la survie de l’humanité, il est nécessaire de rendre les systèmes agro-alimentaires plus durables et plus résilients au climat.
La transformation de l’agriculture et des systèmes alimentaires mondiaux est une tâche centrale pour les années à venir. Garantir la sécurité alimentaire d’une population mondiale croissante, maintenir des écosystèmes sains pour soutenir les revenus et l’économie, limiter les risques climatiques et diminuer les émissions de gaz à effet de serre sont les principaux objectifs de systèmes agricoles et alimentaires (agroalimentaires) pérennes.  Compte tenu de la complexité de cette question, l’agroécologie (AE) s’est imposée dans le débat scientifique et politique comme un paradigme essentiel à y répondre.
The climate crisis and threats to food security are strongly interlinked. Global food and land use systems account for 21-37% of global greenhouse gas emissions and are one of the main drivers of climate change. On the other hand, agricultural production systems are very vulnerable to climate hazards, which are accelerated by climate change. Without action, yield reductions of up to 30% are expected. A rising population further increases food demand. To tackle this problem, adapting agricultural production systems to climate change is an indispensable step. Agroecology provides one solution that aims at developing sustainable land use and food systems and transforming them towards climate resilience and adaptiveness.
Agroecology is an approach that aims at developing sustainable land use and food systems and transforming them towards climate resilience and adaptiveness. The transformation of global agricultural and food systems is a central task of the coming years. Suitable solutions require the integration of as many system components as possible – from food cultivation, processing and trade, through consumers and their behaviour, to the relevant political and social environment.
The 6-step climate risk assessment (CRA) methodology provides practitioners and decision-makers with a guidance on how to assess climate-related risks and how to translate the assessment into measures. Main characteristics of the methodology include the participation of all stakeholders, the assessment of hazards along the entire spectrum from slow onset processes to extreme weather events, the consideration of non-economic losses and damages as well as the focus on risk tolerance levels. It aims at identifying a smart mix of climate risk management measures, combining proven instruments from climate change adaptation and disaster risk management with innovative instruments to address residual risks which cannot be averted. As such, CRA can support evidence-based and risk-informed decision making and planning in the context of climate change.
The CRED Factsheet introduces in the IKI program Policy Advice for Climate-Resilient Economic Development. The factsheet explains the need to assess climate risks and improve adaptation measures. It illustrates the CRED approach in developing human and technical capacities in macro-economic modelling of climate risks in the economic and planning ministries in Kazakhstan, Vietnam and Georgia. This aims at central macro-economic strategies and policies, supporting the implementation of NDC goals and national adaptation plans (NAP).
The CRED Project Brief gives an overview in how to manage economic risks of climate change by macro-economic modelling. The Project Brief introduces the three macro-economic models applied in the three partner countries Kazakhstan, Vietnam and Georgia. It explains how these models support the countries and its political institutions in developing climate-sensitive development plans and economic development strategies by translating the modelling results in evidence-based country specific policies.
The following guidance note presents “why” and “how” the NAP process can be utilized as a key mechanism and driver to mainstream and upscale EbA. It is based on a recent analysis of 19 completed NAP documents that reviewed the inclusion of ecosystems and uptake of EbA measures. The document builds on the lessons learned from the review and identifies guiding principles and actions accordingly. It also presents an overview of ecosystems, ecosystem services and their role in adaptation, and how managing their transformation under a changing climate can contribute to reducing climate risks and impacts for both people and ecosystems. Furthermore, it focuses on guiding principles and recommended actions along the steps of the NAP process to integrate and enhance EbA.
National Adaptation Plan (NAP) processes present a strategic opportunity to raise the profile of EbA approaches, providing a framework—and, potentially, financial resources—for implementation at scale. Based on this , the NAP Global Network undertook a review of 19 NAP documents to better understand the extent to which EbA, as a tool for adaptation, has been taken up in NAP processes. This analysis highlights the extent of integration and identification of ecosystems and EbA into National Adaptation Plans (NAPs), trends in how EbA was incorporated, and opportunities to strengthen the profile and quality of EbA.